Friday, August 01, 2008

カリフォルニア、携帯途中解約違約金が違法であると判決

MercuryNews:Sprint early termination fees are illegal, judge rules
COURT: CALIFORNIA LAW FORBIDS EARLY TERMINATION CHARGES
By Steve Johnson
Mercury News
Article Launched: 07/30/2008 01:31:13 AM PDT

カリフォルニア住民は、携帯電話の途中解約違約金が無くなることで、喜んでいる。
Bay Areaがこのような違約金は合衆国法に反すると判決したからだ。

Californians fed up with being charged for ending their cell phone service prematurely won a major victory in a Bay Area court decision that concluded such fees violate state law.

月曜の予備判決を受け、
Alameda Countyの主任判事Bonnie Sabrawは、
Sprint Nextelはカリフォルニアの顧客に1億8200万円返す義務がある、と述べた。
この判決は可能性があったものの、
州判決で明確に示されたのは、この国でも初めてだ。
携帯電話のユーザが急ピッチで増えている中、同じような裁判に影響することだろう。

In a preliminary ruling Monday, Alameda County Superior Court Judge Bonnie Sabraw said Sprint Nextel must pay California mobile-phone consumers $18.2 million as part of a class-action lawsuit challenging early termination fees.
Though the decision could be appealed, it's the first in the country to declare the fees illegal in a state and could affect other similar lawsuits, with broad implications for the nation's fast-growing legions of cell phone users.

この判決によって、
海外で同じような違約金を巡って提訴している人々が、
携帯キャリアが54億7000万もの違約金を集めようとするのを止めるよう、提言している。
判決では、約200万人のカリフォルニア住民が支払いを求められているという。

The judge - who is overseeing several other suits against telecommunications companies that involve similar fees - also told the company to stop trying to collect $54.7 million from other customers who haven't yet paid the charges they were assessed. The suit said about 2 million Californians were assessed the fee.

しかし、Sabrawの判断はまだ明確ではない。
専門家によると、連邦通信委員会が通信産業側に達立ち、
政府の認証で途中解約違約金を採れるルールを制定するかもしれない。

Whether Sabraw's ruling will stand isn't clear. Experts say an appeal is likely, and the Federal Communications Commission is considering imposing a rule - backed by the wireless industry - which might decree that only federal authorities can regulate early termination fees.

Sprint Nextelは、
このような150〜200ドルの違約金は、カリフォルニア州法の範疇ではないと法廷で訴えている。
Sabrawは「これは恐ろしいルールだ」と言って、
この訴えを退けた。

Sprint Nextel also argued in the lawsuit that such fees - which ranged from $150 to $200 - were outside the purview of California law. But Sabraw rejected that argument.
"This is a terrific ruling," said

No comments: