Saturday, October 04, 2008

あなたの筆が進む10の方法

TechRepublic:10 simple things you can do to improve your writing
September 30th, 2008
Jody Gilbert

もし今日の仕事に迫られているならば,
仕事の成功ため,少しでも適当なライティングスキルを身につける必要がある.
しかしそのスキルに費やす時間がないならば,少しのルールをマスターする事で,大きな違いがでる.

If you’re like much of today’s workforce, you need to have halfway decent writing skills to succeed at your job. But if you don’t have time to work on those skills, mastering a few basic rules can still make a big difference.

もしかしたらあなたは,短いブログを書いたり,経過レポートを書くよう頼まれたり,
同僚の添削をしたり,重要なメールを上司に送ったりしたことがないかもしれない.
もしそうならば,あなたは自由人だ.
しかし我々のほとんどは,一定量を仕事の一部として書いている.
しかも不運な事に,我々の努力はいつも報われるわけではない.

Maybe you’ve never penned a single blog entry, never been asked to write a progress report, never had to read over a colleague’s work for errors, and never had to send a critically important e-mail message to your boss. If that’s the case, you’re free to go now. But for most of us, a certain amount of writing is part of our job — and unfortunately, our efforts aren’t always as effective as they should be.

我々は大きな失敗について話した.
-文法ミス,間違った使い方-これらは我々の文章コミュニケーションによく見られる.
さて,クリーンで実用的な文章をかく,実用的な方法を考えてみよう.
これれはTechRepublicの定例会での会話に基づいたものだ.
一般的に勧められるガイドラインについての定例会だ.
(言い換えれば,あなたは賛同する義務は無い.そしてもちろん,あなたが住んでいる国によってバリエーションがある)

We’ve talked before about some of the big blunders — grammatical mistakes and misused words — that find their way into our written communications. Now, let’s consider some of the general best practices that contribute to clean, consistent writing. These pointers are based on TechRepublic’s in-house conventions, which are based on commonly recommended guidelines. (In other words, you don’t have to agree with them. And of course, variations may exist depending on what country you live in.)

これらのルールをあなたの文章にいかすことで,
独断的,あるいは平凡だと思えるかもしれないが,
あなたが言わんとしていることを凝縮させ,重要でないこと,間違った事をさけられる.

The good thing about following a few rules in your writing, even if some of them seem arbitrary or trivial, is that it frees you up to concentrate on what you’re trying to say instead of trying to figure out why something doesn’t sound right or worrying that it’s just plain wrong.

これらがそれだ.みな文章力の上昇や着実性を実感できるだろう,保証する.
PDFでもダウンロードできる.

And there’s this: People will notice when your writing is tighter and more consistent. I guarantee it.

Note: This information is also available as a PDF download.

#1: 繰り返し
悪い例:
単語やフレーズの繰り返しは,「ここ読んだぞ?」と思わせる.
この欠陥で,集中できなくなる.
例:
いくつかの「しかし」や「例」が一つのパラグラフにあるとき(あるいはほぼ全てのパラグラフにあるとき)
連続すパラグラフは「次に」で始める.
すきな接続語やフレーズは記事全体で使う.(「確実なのは」「たとえば」「ということだ」)
良い例:
読者を悩ませたり,気を散らせたりする繰り返しをさけるよう,修正する.
もっと良いのは,言い回しの繰り返しをなくす事だ.これらは過剰になりやすい.

#1: Echoes

Bad practice: Repeated words or phrases set up an echo in the reader’s head or a “Didn’t I just read that?” glitch that can be distracting.

Example:

Several “but”s or “however”s or “for example”s in one paragraph (or in nearly every paragraph); a series of paragraphs that begin with “Next”
A favorite crutch word or phrase used throughout an article (”ensure that,” “as such”, “that said”)
Best practice: Vary the language to avoid annoying or distracting readers with repeated words. Even better, get rid of some of the repeated verbiage, which usually turns out to be overkill anyway.

#2: 並行しないリスト
悪い例:
よく連続しない構造をリストやヘッダに使ってしまう.
例:
これらのトピックをカバーする.
レジストリのバックアップ
レジストリエディタは君の友達
REGファイルを使う
GUIツールを使う
レジストリの検索
お気に入りを利用する
良い例:
並行しているものを言い換える

#2: Nonparallel list items

Bad practice: We often use an inconsistent structure for lists or headings.

Example:

We will cover these topics:

Backing up the registry
The Registry Editor is your friend
Using REG files
Use a GUI tool
Searching the registry
Take advantage of Favorites
Clean the registry
Best practice: Reword where necessary to make the items parallel.

#3: 同意の問題
悪い例:
我々は時々何が主語であるかを見失う.そして動詞が間違っている.
例:
エディタは天才ではない.
犬,ヤギ,鶏を比較するのは簡単だ.
3分の1の会社が人種差別をしない.
良い例:
目的を精査し,一人称か複数形にするかを決める.
これはいつも明確ではない.

#3: Agreement problems

Bad practice: Sometimes we lose track of what the subject is, and our verb doesn’t match.

Examples:

Neither of the editors are very smart.
The dog, as well as the goat and chicken, are easy to parallel park.
One-third of the company are color blind.
Best practice: Scrutinize the subject to determine whether it’s singular or plural. It’s not always obvious.

#4: 会社,組織を参照するときは「彼ら」
悪い例:
ある会社-あるいは組織は単数では認識されない.
よく複数形で扱われる.が,義務ではない.
例:
Wal-Martにポットを直して欲しいと思う.
Microsoftによると,問題を見つけるつもりだ.
良い例:
よほどの例外でない限り,「it」を使う.

#4: Referring to companies, organizations, etc., as “they”

Bad practice: A company — or any collective group that’s being referred to as a single entity — is often treated as plural, but it shouldn’t be.

Examples:

I wish Wal-Mart would get their pot hole fixed.
Microsoft said they’ll look at the problem.
Best practice: Unless there’s some compelling exception, use “it.”

#5: 副詞をハイフンで
悪い例:
ハイフン無しだと,何かよくわからない
例:
我々は普通の表現を避ける.
リストが,最近追加されたダウンロードをクリックして
良い例:
ハイフンを付けない.「ly」は「次ぎに来る単語を修飾する」という意味なので,
ハイフンで繋ぐ必要はない

#5: Hyphenating “ly” adverbs

Bad practice: “ly” adverbs never take a hyphen, but they pop up a lot.

Examples:

We like to avoid commonly-used expressions.
Click here for a list or recently-added downloads.
Best practice: Don’t hyphenate ly adverbs. The “ly” says “I modify the word that comes next,” so there’s no need to tie them together with a hyphen.

#6: 「that」の代わりに「which」を使う
悪い例:
時々,主節に「which」を使う
例:
1時に始まる予定だったミーティングは,キャンセルになった
この機能を調節するオプションは,使用不可になった.
良い例:
アメリカの英語で慣例として認められているのは,主節でない節を「which」とコンマで示す事が出来る.
いい方法は,その情報が付加的なもの-主ではないかどうかを考える.
もし主節なら「that」を使う

#6: Using “which” instead of “that”

Bad practice: We sometimes use “which” to set off an essential clause (instead of “that”).

Examples:

The meeting which was scheduled for 1:00 has been cancelled.
The option which controls this feature is disabled.
Best practice: The commonly-accepted (haha) convention in American English is to set off a nonessential clause with the word “which” and a comma. One good test is whether the information is extra — not essential to the meaning of the sentence. If the clause is essential, use “that.”

#7: 単語の構造;無用のフレーズ
不必要な言い回しの海へ進むほど悪いものはない.
ここにあなたの文章の中の犯人を挙げる.

#7: Wordy constructions; deadwood phrases

Nothing is worse for a reader than having to slog through a sea of unnecessary verbiage. Here are a few culprits to watch for in your own writing.

Has the ability to = can
At this point in time = now
Due to the fact that = because
In order to = to
In the event that = if
Prior to the start of = before

#8:「who」の代わりに「that」を使う
悪い例:
ライターで「who」の代わりに「that」を使うひとがいる
例:
そのバーテンダーは私のお金をなくした.
そのユーザは,彼が私のお金を見つけた,と朝電話をしてきた.
トレーニングを申し込んだ人たちは時間のむだだったと言った.
良い例:
人を参照するときは,「who」を使う.

#8: Using “that” instead of “who”

Bad practice: Some writers use “that” to refer to people.

Examples:

The bartender that took my money disappeared.
The end user that called this morning said he found my money.
The folks that attended the training said it was a waste of time.
Best practice: When you’re referring to people, use “who.”

#9: 一貫しない連続コンマの最後
悪い例:
ある慣例では,3つ以上を並べる連続コンマの最後にもコンマを置く.
他では,(これもよくあるが)省略する.
しかし,ライターは板挟みになっている.
例:
(省略)
良い例:
一つの慣例に決め,貫く事.
あなたの記事の読者は,
あなたが一貫していれば,文章をすらすら読める.

#9: Inconsistent use of the final serial comma

Bad practice: One convention says to use a comma to set off the final item in a series of three or more items; another (equally popular) convention says to leave it out. But some writers bounce between the two rules.

Examples:

Word, Excel, and Outlook are all installed. (OR: Word, Excel and Outlook are all installed.)
Open the dialog box, click on the Options tab, and select the Enable option. (OR: Open the dialog box, click on the Options tab and select the Enable option.)
Best practice: Decide on one convention and stick to it. Those who read what you’ve written will have an easier time following your sentence structure if you’re consistent.

#10: 二つの節をコンマでつなげる
悪い例:
コンマは議論の源であり,見当違いの判断の犠牲者を出す.
しかし,これにはルールがある.
2つの節はコンマを必要としない.
例:
(省略)
良い例:
もし2つ目の節が独立せず,独自であれば,コンマを置くべきではない.

#10: Using a comma to join two dependent clauses

Bad practice: Commas are a great source of controversy and often the victim of misguided personal discretion. But there is this rule: Two dependent clauses don’t need one.

Examples:

I hid the ice cream, and then told my sister where to find it.
The user said he saved the file, but somehow deleted it.
Best practice: If the second clause can’t walk away and be its own sentence, don’t set it off with a comma.


これは訳して後悔しました.
lost in translationを感じました.


No comments: