Thursday, February 04, 2010

Symbianがオープンソースへ

Mashable:Symbian OS Goes Open Source
by Stan Schroeder

今日,Symbian 3 mobile OSオープンソースコードが解禁され,無料で使えるようになった.
これはS60, S40などの後継バージョンにあたる.
Nokiaが2008年にSymbianを傘下に入れ,
ソフトを作る組織を財団化した.
そして現在は,全ての携帯電話メーカーが使えるようになった.
SymbianのソースコードはEclipse Public Licenseの下で発行される.

As of today, the source code of Symbian 3 mobile OS (the successor of previous Symbian versions, S60, S40 and others) is open and free to use. Nokia had acquired Symbian back in 2008, turned the consortium that makes the software into the Symbian foundation, and has now decided to make it available to all phone manufacturers. The source code is published under the Eclipse Public License (EPL).

3億3千万台の携帯で使われる,一番人気の携帯電話用OSであるにもかかわらず,
Sybianは最近は不安定な状態だった.
ひとつの原因は,急激に人気になったiPhoneで,追いつかれつつある.
もうひとつはmotorolaなど多くの携帯メーカーが採用した,
オープンソースのAndroidだ.
AndroidはSymbianよりもiPhoneに似た機能を提供した.

Although it’s the most popular mobile OS, powering some 330 million phones, Symbian has been in some sort of a limbo lately. On one side, it competed against the increasingly popular (and completely closed) iPhone, while many manufacturers, such as Motorola, opted to use the open source Android, which offers a much more similar experience to iPhone than most Symbian phones.

Symbian財団エグゼクティヴディレクターのLee Williamsは,
この新しいオープンSymbianはAndroidを超える可能性を持っていると言う.
彼が言うには,Symbianは完全にオープンで
「Androidのコードの3分の1がオープンだが,それ以上はない.
しかもオープンなのはミドルウェアの集まりだ.それ以外はクローズやプロプライエタリだ」

Lee Williams, executive director of the Symbian Foundation, claims that the new, open Symbian has an advantage over Android. Symbian is fully open, he says, while “about a third of the Android code base is open and nothing more. And what is open is a collection of middleware. Everything else is closed or proprietary.”

Symbianがこの競争に遅かったかどうかを考えざるを得ない.
多くのメーカーがすでにWindows MobileとSymbianから離れ,
Androidに賛同した.
数社のメーカーは(MotorolaのDroidのように)Androidベースのデバイスで成功している.
新しいSymbianはオープンソースになり,
Symnianがメーカーにとって魅力的なものとなるか,見守ることにしよう.

Still, one can’t help but wonder whether Symbian is a bit late to the game here. Many manufacturers have already all but ditched Windows Mobile and Symbian in favor of Android, and some of them (like Motorola with their Droid) have been quite successful with Android-based devices. Whether the new version of Symbian, together with the move to open source, will be enough to make Symbian interesting to manufacturers, remains to be seen.

No comments: